The Fantasy Football War Room

Understanding football for the sake of fantasy

Takeaway from first day of NFL Combine

The big news out of the NFL combine so far is Terron Armstead from Arkansas-Pine Bluff. At 305 pounds and 6’5 he ran a blazing fast 4.71 40 yd dash officially. He posted an unofficial 4.65.

So what does this all mean? Well, if NFL teams have learned anything it means nothing at all. I have no doubt that Terron Armstead can play football at a decently high level but the question is how high?

Every year there are a few guys who show up at the combine and become mesh short all stars. They are the guys who couldn’t quite string together any type of consistency at the college level or who come from a small school.

They look great in shorts and a t-shirt but never really make it happen on the field. The most famous case is Mike Mamula, the defensive end out of Boston College. Then there was Derrius Hayward-Bay, who after posting a 4.3 40 yard dash, found himself getting drafted in the top 10 and securing a lottery contract.

So how does this happen? The most obvious answer is arrogance and pride. Most coaches think if they have a nice lump of clay that they can mold it into a piece of art. In other words, they can coach the player up to their level.

Well, there is a reason these guys performed like they did or ended up at the schools they did. Terron Armstead will get drafted but I have a feeling teams have somewhat learned their lesson. If he goes any higher than the 3rd round of the draft then it’s a complete waste of a pick. He’s worth a 3rd round pick because you’ll obviously have to develop his skill set for a few years. The 1st and 2nd round are usually used for immediate impact players, not developmental prospects.

Manti Te’o: Ok. Te’o got catfished. He’s moved on now it’s time for us to do so as well. I’d be willing to bet a lot of people have been catfished and that it’s more common than most people are willing to admit.

That doesn’t take away the fact that the guy can play football and play it well. I think he’s handled the situation amazingly well. I think that will help him when he steps into a new locker room full of veterans who will no doubt tear into him for being foolish.

He is worth a mid to late round draft pick in my eyes, despite the fact that he played poorly against the Crimson Tide offense. Some might say thats evidence that he can’t hold up against NFL caliber lines. Well, everyone has a bad game but I’m sure Te’o will have NFL caliber defensive tackles holding the point of attack for him and also NFL caliber defensive coordinators putting him in better position to succeed.

Te’o has all the tools to be a big time middle linebacker and the way he’s handled all this bad press and publicity will only help him perform in high pressure situations on Sunday’s.

Speaking of the Crimson Tide offensive line, Chance Warmack, who is considered one of the highest rated interior line prospects of the last 10-15 years, posted a very slow 5.4 40 yd dash.

The reaction is who cares? His game tape doesn’t lie and when is Chance Warmack going to run 40 yds untouched down the field on Sundays? Probably never. He will run straight into linebackers and safeties blowing them up but he will probably never have to run a 40 yd dash in shorts and a t-shirt again.

D.J. Fluker, his linemate, ran a similarly disapointing 40yd dash but his makes a lot more sense. Fluker is known for having “lead feat” and it shows in a big way on his game tape. His time just confirmed worries in war rooms around the league. He didn’t look particularly nimble in other drills so it will be interesting to see how this effects his draft status.

It essentially pins him to 2 positions the rest of his career: right tackle and right guard. Versatility is one of the biggest ways to shoot up the draft boards. It sounds like D.J. Fluker cost himself some money.

Now that we have the boring positions out of the way I’m excited to see how some top flight defensive talent performs. I am itching to see how some of the cornerbacks test out as well as every position on the defensive line. It’s always interesting to see a defensive end come out of no where with a blistering 40 yard dash and out of this worl vertical jump.

Was it pass interference? Or a poorly coached game?

Is it catch-able? Un-Catch-able? Was it a penalty? or Not?

It really doesn’t matter anymore but it’s my general understanding that when the game’s on the line you “Let the players play” or “Let it play out” and the refs aren’t supposed to be so trigger happy with a flag.

In this case I think it was a penalty though. Crabtree is a physical receiver really coming into his own and he was guilty of contact as well.

You could argue it wasn’t catch-able but this demonstrates perfectly why this is a game of inches. Crabtree looks like he has a legit shot at it.

Let’s just say it was a penalty and the 49ers got robbed. You know what I say to that? Where were you the first 30 minutes of the game? Where you were getting beat 21-6 before the blackout? When Joe Flacco was dropping laser beams on Cullivers head and evoking cheers from every gay man or woman who pay attention to football around the nation?

Where was Greg Romans innovative play calling and Colin Kaepernicks game breaking ability?

No, I’m not a Ravens fan nor am I bashing the 49ers. I am just stating that it was a tale of two halves. In my eyes, if the game comes down to a play like that and you’re on the losing end of it then you have no room to argue. The 49ers blew several other game breaking opportunities throughout the game to either take the lead or keep it close.

Instead they had to play catch up the whole game.

And we’ll never forget the fact that a HOF Middle Linebacker named Ray Lewis, won a super bowl ring in the final 30 seconds on a 4 and out goal line stand.

So, before you go pointing fingers at something you can’t control. Look into the mirror and point at yourself. You’ll see two things:

1. one finger pointing at your reflection

2. Three others pointing right back at yourself

So, who’s truly to blame?

Is it catch-able? Un-Catch-able? Was it a penalty? or Not?

It really doesn’t matter anymore but it’s my general understanding that when the game’s on the line you “Let the players play” or “Let it play out” and the refs aren’t supposed to be so trigger happy with a flag.

In this case I think it was a penalty though. Crabtree is a physical receiver really coming into his own and he was guilty of contact as well.

You could argue it wasn’t catch-able but this demonstrates perfectly why this is a game of inches. Crabtree looks like he has a legit shot at it.

Let’s just say it was a penalty and the 49ers got robbed. You know what I say to that? Where were you the first 30 minutes of the game? Where you were getting beat 21-6 before the blackout? When Joe Flacco was dropping laser beams on Cullivers head and evoking cheers from every gay man or woman who pay attention to football around the nation?

Where was Greg Romans innovative play calling and Colin Kaepernicks game breaking ability?

No, I’m not a Ravens fan nor am I bashing the 49ers. I am just stating that it was a tale of two halves. In my eyes, if the game comes down to a play like that and you’re on the losing end of it then you have no room to argue. The 49ers blew several other game breaking opportunities throughout the game to either take the lead or keep it close.

Instead they had to play catch up the whole game.

And we’ll never forget the fact that a HOF Middle Linebacker named Ray Lewis, won a super bowl ring in the final 30 seconds on a 4 and out goal line stand.

So, before you go pointing fingers at something you can’t control. Look into the mirror and point at yourself. You’ll see two things:

1. one finger pointing at your reflection

2. Three others pointing right back at yourself

So, who’s truly to blame?

CBS San Francisco

SAN FRANCISCO (CBS Sports) — Given his inability to keep a straight face, Jim Harbaugh must be a horrible poker player.

So it was hardly surprising when the San Francisco 49ers coach told the media shortly after the Ravens’ 34-31 Super Bowl win that he thought the officials missed a pass interference call on wide receiver Michael Crabtree that would’ve given the 49ers a first-and-goal with 1:50 to go in the game.

Instead, Baltimore got the ball on downs, ran three plays, took a safety, and four seconds after Ted Ginn fielded the ensuing punt, Super Bowl XLVII was over.

During an appearance this week in San Francisco, Harbaugh was again asked about the idea of “letting players play” as it related to the Crabtree no-call.

“I would say it exactly like Bill Polian: A penalty is a penalty no matter when it occurs in a game,” he said. “It…

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If luck didn’t have anything to do with it, I’d win everytime

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There is a force in the NFL that people don’t seem to give enough credit to. It’s something that plays a huge part in the playoffs. It can help or hurt a team. Every year, a few teams seem to bottle it up to huge game breaking and history making plays. Sometimes it cripples a team emotionally and physically to the point where it takes them years to get back to the playoffs again. What is it?

Luck. In poker they call it variance. The truth of the matter, because of the format of the playoffs, a tournament, there it plays a much larger role than people care to say. In any format that crowns one team or person a champion, luck plays a bigger role than anyone cares to admit.

What truly differentiates a bad team from a good team, or a good team from a great one, is how consistently they are able to put themselves in position to make deep runs into the playoffs. Any team that can do that for over half a decade is elite in my book and the New England Patriots are just that. Let’s explore a little more…

I think the Patriots demenstrate how hard it is to win super bowls.

It’s confusing when you really look at all the statistics that go into it.

At the begining, you have a developing Tom Brady with a defensive minded coach. The defense orchestrated the bend but don’t break philosophy to protection and they made enough big plays and caused enough turnovers to win games.

On the offense you had a young Tom Brady who was extremely effecient. I think game manager is too extreme of a term to use when refering to Tom when he first started playing but he was by no means elite. He was very clutch and, as I mentioned above, extremely efficient.

He didn’t turn the ball over and also had a pretty damn good runningback in Corey Dillion.

That all changed just before Moss got there. Once Moss did get there I think it opened Brady’s as to what he was really capable of and he also progressed in a big way and became an elite QB.

But then they couldn’t win the superbowl despite the fact he was doing things at the position no one else had ever done. His offense was fun to watch and bellicheck and him dismantled teams only to flame out in the super bowl or playoffs ever since they won their last super bowl.

So what’s the explanation? It’s not spygate. I don’t believe in that overblown media frenzy. Is Tom not as clutch as he used to be? Is it a lack of an elite runner? Poot defensive play? What is it?

I don’t know but I have my theories and the only thing I can truly come up with is how much chance plays a part once you get into the playoffs. It’s a tournament format and if you lose you’re out.

If you play poker tournaments you’re familiar with how luck plays a bigger part the further and deeper you get into it.

You will consistently see the best players in the world put themselves in position to win it, only to get wiped out by a bad run of cards. The percentages are low to win a poker tournament, with the best in the world only converting 2-5% into wins.

But that’s not including 2nd-10th place, which is where the big money is. People forget easily that there is only one champion at the end of the year and because of that you also need things to fall your way AND also play well to put yourself into position to fall your way.

During the season, teams have an opportunity to fix their mistakes and right the ship. If a team stumbles to 2-3, lets say, they have a chance to correct any mental errors that cost them and make a push to the playoffs.

In the playoffs you don’t have that opportunity. You make a mistake and it’s magnified 10 fold. You can fix the mistake but can’t apply it to the next game. It’s better luck next year for you.

In a poker tournament a good player will make the money 20-30% of the time. So, that means they cash 30 times out of every 100 tournaments.

But they only win the thing 5 times out of a 100, no matter how good they are.

The mark of a great team is when they consistently put themselves in position to make deep runs into the playoffs. That’s what the Patriots have been so good at, and because they can’t turn it into super bowl wins, doesn’t mean they aren’t great anymore or that Tom Brady is passed his prime.

It just means that we should all take into consideration that luck and chance or whatever you want to call it, play a much bigger role in the playoffs than it does in the regular season.

 

Randy Moss is the Greatest WR of all time

Today, Randy Moss declared himself the greatest receiver of all time. You know what? I agree with him and have been quietly telling myself this for the passed few years. I said told someone this a few years ago when he retired and almost got burned at the stake. For the next few years after, I went back to whispering it for fear of losing my life.

Before you smash your computer screen in I’m going to tell you why. It’s not all about black and White numbers. In other words, not all statistics are created equally.

Let me ask you something really quick. Two receivers catch 40 yard bombs for touchdowns. Who’s the better receiver? The numbers are identical but whats the context of the 1 catch for 40 yards and a touchdown? Who threw the football? Was it in a dome? Who was covering the receiver? How many players were covering him? Is this the exception or the rule, in other words, is this something the receiver does regularly or once in a long while?

That’s the point here. If you look at black and white numbers, such as receiving yards, catches and touchdowns, it doesn’t tell the whole story to a certain point. The NFL is constantly changing. Athletes are getting bigger, stronger faster and defenses and offenses are constantly adjusting and re-adjusting to the skill levels.

What I’m trying to say is that Randy Moss made a much larger impact on a play by play basis than Jerry Rice did. He commanded more defensive attention than any other receiver there ever was up to this point. Now that may change in 10 years. I feel more comfortable ranking them as 1A and 1B than saying one is number 1 and the other number 2.

Before we get into the base of my argument I would like to point out one key point. You can’t use post season as a measuring stick. Why? Because when has receiver ever been a position we look at as leading a team into the playoffs and a super bowl. It’s simply not fair, and if you’re a sheer stats geek and numbers guy, you’ll understand it a little better than if you’re not.

A receiver touches the ball 10%-15% of the offensive snaps a game. Where did I get this number? Well lets just say an offense runs about 60 plays a game on average. A good game for a WR is 5-8 catches for 110-130 yards and a TD. That’s 12% of offensive snaps. Lets not add run blocking plays because then it’ll get too complicated.

Now compare this to the QB who touches it 100% of the time and you’ll kind of understand why it’s unfair to make this comparison. People forget that football is the ultimate team game and that individual positions will have a hard time simply taking over the game as compared to NBA basketball. So much has to work in unison for a play to be successful so you can’t mark players off for not making the post season unless you play QB or RB.

Enough of that. Let’s get back to my main argument:

1. Game isn’t always about black and white numbers.  It’s more so the effect that a player has on the game during his time. The game changes constantly. You have to look at the context of the game during that time in that what were offenses and defenses doing? 50 years ago they were running the shit out of the ball so how do we compare someone from that time period to someone from this time period? To put it simply, how readily they dominated their position as compared to their peers. Were looking for not only statistical outliers and consistencies but also how they separated themselves from the rest.

Randy Moss had an incredible impact on every defense he faced whether he caught the ball or not. People always want to point at the fact that he said he plays when he wants to play and takes plays off. Well, that actually works in favor of my argument because if he was taking plays off and still posted these types of numbers than that’s all the more incredible.

No WR has had the effect on opposing defenses as Moss did during his prime. I’m not going to do a side by side comparison of numbers like everyone else. I want to show you something else in how he elevated the quarterbacks that he played for, lifting them to a level they had never been.

Every QB that has played with Randy Moss during his prime has put up career years.

1998 as a rookie Moss caught 17 touchdowns and over 1300 yards. Randall Cunningham, stepping in for an injured Brad Johnson, put up a whopping 34 touchdowns to only 10 picks and 3100 yards through the air!

Not only that the Vikings went 15-1 and set the record for most points in one season at 556! This was before the aerial assault we have in the NFL today.

Sounds familiar doesn’t it? Because it is very much so because Randy ended up playing for another team that put up offensive records similar to that in the 2008 New England Patriots who featured Tom Brady throwing an NFL record 50 touchdown passes and leading the patriots to an undefeated regular season.

Moss caught 23 touchdowns, breaking most TD’s in a season by a receiver. Tom had the best year of his career and won MVP and offensive player of the year.

Notice a consistent pattern?

Next up we have Daunte Culpepper, who was quite the offensive weapon under Randy Moss.

In 2004 he set NFL records, passing for 4700 yards and totaling over 5100 yards passing and rushing with 39 touchdowns and only 11 interceptions. His 2300 yards rushing during a 5 year period made him one of only 4 QB’s to do so. It may or may not have had something to do with Randy Moss, who defensive coordinators had to get DB’s to give a bigger cushion for because of the way he could take the top off a defense.

So 3 QB’s had record-setting years under Randy Moss. Tom Brady also had 2 of the best years of his career with him playing WR and Daunte Culpeper was considered a top 10 QB playing with Moss and sometimes even top 5. Matt Cassel looked elite and landed a mega contract playing with Randy Moss. While he had a decent year after that he probably would have never gotten a $60 million year without Randy. All QB’s had to do was to throw it up and Moss would consistently come down with it in double and tripple coverage.

Sure. He had some down years with Oakland. He’s having another with San Fransisco.  He won’t get Rices receiving record but the game isn’t always about black an white numbers. You have to look at how the player impacted the players around him on his team as well as the opposing team.

It’s about the impact that player had on the game during that time. In that respect Randy Moss was making defensive backs an coordinators look straight foolish. If you’re too young to have watched him play then you may never really get an idea of what he did.

It’s easy to disregard Randy for what he looks like now and also when you have guys like megatron running around.

But Moss was well ahead of his time. He had incredible body control. At the very least he is second or third.

He is a different kind of beast. A talent at the time that was never seen before. Rice is a great receiver and I even rank them 1A and 1B

But to the people saying he isn’t top 5 you really haven’t say down and done your research or even know football.

No. I am not a Vikings fan. Just a fan of the entire NFL and enjoy breaking down the game and everything in it.

Flame away.

Change: The only constant in the NFL.

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I am a die hard fan of the NFL. If you ask me who I root for on Sundays I couldn’t give you one team. Maybe that seems weird to some but to me it’s not. I think it’s weird that you would limit yourself to following one team while there are 32 other amazing story lines playing out all year long. Amongst those 32 main teams there are literally thousands of mini storyline amongst players, coaches and other personell. Teams are constantly rising and falling an the only thing that is constant is change.

Some teams have shown the ability to capture change, albeit for brief periods of time, as if it’s a bucking bull and teams are a rider trying to hang on for 8 seconds. Other’s can’t even seem to stay on for more than a second, getting battered, bruised and gored in the process and taking years to find their confidence again.

So I ask you, why cheat yourself by only following one team when the NFL has more drama than 1000 soap operas? The whole thing is incredibly fascinating theater. While your team may be bottom feeding for half a decade a team such as the New England Patriots could be dominating. One thing is for sure though: The teams at the top don’t last and neither do the ones at the bottom. The league is dynamic not static. Every year the level of competition increases. New players demonstrating athletic abilities unheard before come in and raise the level at their position. Fresh new coaches with huge egotistical chips on their shoulders bring in innovative play calling that forces others to adjust and -re-adjust. The coaches and players who enter the league with a mindset of not losing don’t last very long and are phased out rather quickly. The coaching carousal is constantly moving and those that can’t hang on are thrown off at the highest of speeds.

A general rule of thumb for a head coach is 3 years. This gives them enough time to install their philosophy on both sides of the ball while also bringing in the players that fit their schemes. Anything past 3 years isn’t really guaranteed and neither is the initial 3 years. Sometimes coaches screw somethings up so badly that owners won’t even wait that long to bring out the axe. Josh McDaniels is a good example of that, starting out on fire only to flame out after 1.5 years.

Today, several high profile coaches got the axe. Whether they deserved it or not their teams failed to perform when it meant the most. Below are my thoughts on what went down.

Ken Wisenhunt: It’s hard to fire a coach that was just in the Superbowl a few years ago. Those few years actually feel like 20 because of how badly the Cardinals collapsed this year. They started 4-0, beating the New England Patriots, only the end up 5-11. I think everyone who knows their football kind of felt that the 4-0 start was a bit of a fluke and anticipated somewhat of a drop off but this was the stuff of legend. It just goes to show you how important having even an average NFL QB is. That defense is world class but imagine how much harder they would’ve played for a guy who put points on the board? With an average QB I think this team goes 11-5 or 10-6 and probably prevents the Seahawks from making the playoffs. Of course, the offensive line needs help too but those guys are a lot easier to come by.

Norv Turner: I’ve never been too high on this guys. I don’t know what he says during interviews but he always seems to get a decent job and is well player. His record speaks for itself, 4 winning seasons in 15 years and I think most of those were with the Chargers. Not only that, those weren’t even his players, they were Marty Schottenheimers picks! You can see what a bad coach Norv really is now looking at the Chargers now compared to when Marty was there. He’s a good coordinator but that’s about it. Don’t get me started on AJ Smith, who is charmingly referred to as “The Lord Of No Rings” in the NFL. How many game breakers did this guy get rid of during his time there because he’s an arrogant prick who gets high on his own farts? Vincent Jackson, Michael Turner, Darren Sproles and Antonio Cromartie? Not only thats, Eli Manning refused to go there because of AJ Smith. 2 super bowls later and I’m really not sure how this guy secures another job.

Andy Reid: This one breaks my heart the most. I love Andy Reid! He is an amazing coach and one day he will get his super bowl ring. His track record speaks for itself: 5 NFC Championships, 1 super bowl appearance an I think 9 winning seasons out of 14. He has sent over 47 players to the pro bowl and has squeezed the best out of every quarterback who he’s coached. I’m not sure how great Donavan McNabb would be without Andy Reid but it’s hard to argue with the evidence at hand. After McNabb left his career went straight down the tubes. That’s even after going to two of the most friendly QB coaches in the league with the shanahan’s. Not only that he had to deal with the overdose death of his son Garret and on top of that all those big name players signed a year ago decided to take the season off. He also had no O-Line depth and had to sit back and watch Michael Vick get pummeled. I would love nothing more than for Andy Reid to land right back on his feet which I expect him to do so. My Personal dream scenario would be if he went to Carolina and paired up with Cam Newton! Any die hard football fan would die happy if they could see this play out on Sunday’s for the next 10 years. Andy loves to pass and so does Cam Newton. Cam has the confidence that teeters on borderline arrogance to succeed under Andy Reids watch. Not only that there are some other great pieces on the defense. The offense needs a little work but Andy has always been able to get the best out of no name receivers. Please Andy go to Carolina!

This article is going a little longer than I expected. Hey! What else do you expect from an NFL nerd? I’ll break down the other coaching changes in about an hour as I geek out on a little more information. Until then happy new year! Don’t do too much of what you may regret tomorrow.

These guys deserved to make the Pro Bowl

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Maybe were just splitting hairs here but here are a few guys I thought should have made the pro bowl but didn’t. Getting snubbed during voting is the result of a variety of factors, one of the biggest being the Madden effect. There are plenty of fans out there who base their voting on how the player did in their video game, not from actual real life non-polygon game action. How do I know this? Well, it’s mostly just a theory, or a hunch, but one of my biggest pieces of evidence is the former Cowboys safety from Oklahoma, Roy Williams.

You see when Roy came out of Oklahoma he posted freakish like numbers at the NFL Combine. This was back before everyone watched the combine and the draft began at 9:30AM! Well, 11:30 East coast but 9:30 if you live in Colorado like me (Don’t even try to act like you woke up for it).

He was the first of what would become a trend where teams began to draft freak safeties in the top 10. Everyone wanted one of these hard hitting guys who ran a 4.3 and could jump over your whole family (with the new rules they aren’t as effective but that’s a topic for another day).

Anyways, Roy Williams had a consistent problem that plagued him for his entire career: He had the tendency to give up big plays and get beat deep. You know, the most important job for a safety, he couldn’t even do.

This was on full display during a 2005 Monday night football game that had the cowboys playing the Redskins. With the Skins’ down 13-0 with under 5 mintes left Mark Brunell hit Santana Moss in the back of the endzone, right over Roy Williams head.

Well, after the Skins stopped the Cowboys on their next possession, Brunell bombed it to Santana Moss again over Roy Williams head, who then took it to the house, with the final score 14-13 Redskins!

Quick Note: Santana Moss and Roy Williams both posted 4.3 40yd dashes at the combine. Apparently there are two different 4.3 40 yd dash speeds because Santana Moss made ol’ Roy eat his dust. Weird

Anyways, all that isn’t really the point. The thing that never made sense was that Roy Williams made 5 straight pro bowls! 5! And during that time he gave up a lot of huge plays to opposing offenses. At the end of the day he turned out to be a great run stuffing safety, kind of like having another linebacker out there. He never really became the dominant enforcer that they wanted him to be because even if he ended up knocking someones socks off the next series he’d give up a pass play that made him look silly.

How was he in Madden during that time? Well, apparently EA Sports never got the memo that he just wasn’t all that great. They just gave him the best stats in all the areas that counted. His speed, agility, acceleration and strength were all in the high 90’s. In the game he didn’t give up many big plays and was always around the ball. If you played with him in franchise mode he would level up to a 99 and, surprise surprise, make pro bowl after pro bowl. The Madden effect at its finest!

Enough nerd talk! Heres my list of guys I think should’ve made the pro bowl but got snubbed instead. Never mind if it’s a pointless game to watch. If applied correctly the pro bowl proves to others that you’re a dominant player during your stint in the league, unless of course, you’re a safety for the cowboys named Roy Williams who ran a slow 4.3 40 yd dash. Is that even possible?

1. Andrew Luck: Ok. Ok. I get it. RG3 is sweet to watch but all Andrew Luck did was live up to some of the biggest, if not THE biggest, hype of all time for an incoming rookie coming out of college. What about all the Peyton manning comparisons? Oh, well, he merely exceeded them in his first year, breaking the rookie passing yardage mark set by Cam Newton just one year ago. But he can’t possibly perform under the pressure created by playing after one of the top 3 QB’s of all time, could he? Well, actually, yes he can not only perform but he has done it in style, turning around a team that raised the white flag last year right after the previous season had ended. They got pummeled last year but he has gotten the best out of a subpar group of players and also added a few mores years to the careers of former stars like Reggie Wayne, Dwight Freeney and Rasheen Mathis. Yes, I know two of those guys play defense but that’s the incredible effect a great QB can have on all phases of the game. The defense will rally and play harder for a guy who they trust and believe in and also have the opposite effect by giving up before a game even starts (See the 2011 Indianapolis Colts for proof of this effect in a bad way).

Anyways, all he’s done is take the worst team of last year to the playoffs. Manning didn’t even do that. What about all those picks he throws? You can shove those picks up your ace because Manning had way more his rookie year and also posted a record well below .500 at, correct me if I’m wrong, 3-13. I rest my case.

2. Roddy White: Roddy White getting snubbed for his very own teammate Julio Jones is like finding your prom date at the dance with your 40 year old uncle. Alright, definitely not that weird but it sure is a little bit off don’t yah think? Roddy has 200 more yards receiving, more 20+ yard receiving plays and more catches resulting in first downs than Julio. Remember when everyone was all excited about Julio Jones breaking out this year? Well, he wasn’t as dominant as we all thought and he also disappeared in several games while old reliable kept churning out the yards. How can you get a promotion when you show up every other week? Once again, look to the Madden effect for explanation. Roddy White has been doing it for years and it’s straight up disrespectful to vote Julio in over him. Being the class act that he is I’m sure it’ll just roll off his back as he has another 7 catch, 115 yd receiving day with 1 receiving TD. Wheres Mr. Jones you say? I thought he was on the field but that would be hard to argue for with 2 catches for 9 yards. Burn.

3. Dez Bryant: Receivers are a frustrating group of players. One year they play like god, the next year they play like your sister. They disappear for several games, posting under 50 yds a game on just 3 receptions, then suddenly wake up with 150 yds on 6 catches and 2 touchdowns. It truly is rare to have a consistent wide receiver year in and year out. There are like 5-6 in the entire league on any given year and most begin to flame out in their early 30’s.

Well, Dez had this flash in the pan receiver act down to a tee. I would’ve put my whole life savings on him fitting the description above (P.S. I have a hard time saving anything). I was on the bandwagon who never thought he’d put it together, and if he did, couldn’t keep it together for very long.

Well, whatever ends up happening with ol’ Dez doesn’t matter this year. He deserves to be in the Pro Bowl. Look at the way he’s dominated the 2nd half of games? The last game he had over 200 yds receiving with only 9 working fingers! He’s making defensive backs look silly and finally, after 3 long years, showing us what we’ve always thought he could do but never had up to this point!

Will he continue to do so? I don’t know and I really don’t care. Sit Victor Cruz down and put Dez in there. So what if he can’t salsa and needs a round the clock security crew. He is making receivers with 10 fingers looks straight up stupid.